Wilfred Rhodes – Part 1 – with Patrick Ferriday image
The Golden Age of Cricket Podcast
Wilfred Rhodes – Part 1 – with Patrick Ferriday
Wilfred Rhodes – Part 1 – with Patrick Ferriday

Records are made to be broken, but in all likelihood, those belonging to Wilfred Rhodes (1877–1973) will stand for eternity. His 4204 wickets across 1110 First-Class matches must be incomprehensible to modern cricketers, who split their time and effort across multiple formats. He played his first Test in 1899 alongside WG Grace and his last in 1930 at a time when Bradman was taking all before him. At 52 years & 165 days, he still holds the record for being the oldest person to play a Test Match. But his career was much more than just longevity and gigantic numbers.

ABOUT PATRICK FERRIDAY:

Born in London, he lived for many years in West Berlin but returned to England to work as a racing commentator in the early nineties. Since 2011 he’s written four books and published a number of others, via his own publishing group – Von Krumm Publishing. He now lives in Brighton where, in 2021, he wrote and published the long-awaited biography – Wilfred Rhodes: The Triumphal Arch.

CREDITS:

Presenter & Producer: Tom Ford

All music used in the podcast comes from the University of California Santa Barbara’s remarkable collection of wax cylinder’s from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, which are free to download and use. You can donate to the upkeep of these recordings via their website.

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Records are made to be broken, but in all likelihood, those belonging to Wilfred Rhodes (1877–1973) will stand for eternity. His 4204 wickets across 1110 First-Class matches must be incomprehensible to modern cricketers, who split their time and effort across multiple formats. He played his first Test in 1899 alongside WG Grace and his last in 1930 at a time when Bradman was taking all before him. At 52 years & 165 days, he still holds the record for being the oldest person to play a Test Match. But his career was much more than just longevity and gigantic numbers.

ABOUT PATRICK FERRIDAY:

Born in London, he lived for many years in West Berlin but returned to England to work as a racing commentator in the early nineties. Since 2011 he’s written four books and published a number of others, via his own publishing group – Von Krumm Publishing. He now lives in Brighton where, in 2021, he wrote and published the long-awaited biography – Wilfred Rhodes: The Triumphal Arch.

CREDITS:

Presenter & Producer: Tom Ford

All music used in the podcast comes from the University of California Santa Barbara’s remarkable collection of wax cylinder’s from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, which are free to download and use. You can donate to the upkeep of these recordings via their website.

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